• DAVID MITLYNG

Weekly Takeaways:April 12, 2022


Theme of the Week

Dual Use, Not Equal Use Recently Russia has been jamming GPS in Ukraine, the Black Sea, Finland, Norway, and Turkey. While this has grounded commercial flights and degraded networks, it is not creating problems for the military. GPS is a textbook example of a dual use technology used for both military and civilian applications. But that doesn’t mean they have equal capabilities. GPS was originally developed for military use only. It was only made available for civilian use after the KAL 007 tragedy, but with a built-in degradation. When that was lifted in 2000, it created 764 new companies and trillions of dollars of economic benefit for one of “the largest venture outcomes in history." But there are still restrictions on civilian use that throttle commercial progress. For example, timing from GPS enabled 4G LTE wireless networks, but is not good enough for 5G. It is time to split off a dedicated commercial solution from dual use. Last Week's Theme: A Single Point of Failure


Following up from good set of meetings at Satellite 2022 in Washington DC and Space Symposium in Colorado Springs.


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The More You Know...

Not a surprise for this audience that Russia and China have the capability to knock out GPS satellites. But a recent NBC report is bringing this news to the general public. There also now suspicions that Russia has been disrupting commercial satellite and Starlink satellite internet service in Ukraine and Europe. The US Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has issued an alert over potential threats to satellite networks and a recommendation for better satellite cybersecurity, expressing concern about “evolving attacks by criminals, terrorists, and nation states.” This also includes the capability to hack an operational on-orbit satellite. A Telesat GEO satellite was recently hacked as part of an assisted demonstration during a recent hacker convention.

Concerns about satellite security has inspired the US government to host hacking contests and led to additional funding in the recent defense budget.